Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease


Just like in coronary artery disease, angioplasty and stenting can be done in the peripheral arteries, such as the legs, which is one of the most common location of peripheral arterial disease. This procedure is similar to cardiac stenting and involves a short hospital stay and short recovery thereafter. In severe cases, open bypass of the arteries may be done, which involves longer hospitalization and rehabilitation.

Carotid artery disease is blocked arteries in the neck, which supply the brain. Untreated, this can lead to a stroke and loss of limb function, speech or mental abilities. Procedures for carotid artery disease also include stenting or a procedure called endarterectomy, where the cholesterol plaque is surgically removed from the artery. Again, stenting requires less hospitalization and is appropriate in less severe cases, while endarterectomy is a more extensive open surgical procedure requiring more hospital time and more recovery.

Treatment of venous disease involves treatment of the consequences of varicose veins, venous insufficiency (poor circulation) or blood clots in the veins. Most often, this occurs in the legs. Treatments include devices to reduce leg or arm swelling, medications to promote healthy vein function and to dissolve blood clots and in some cases surgical procedures to remove or repair the veins using laser surgery or open surgical procedures.